WellBeing

Living a healthy lifestyle and eating right are good for you, although it will not eliminate your risk of prostate cancer, nor will they cure you by themselves if you are diagnosed with prostate cancer. To ensure that the patient is able to continue to enjoying their life, below are some recommendations for managing the known treatment side effects

 

Remember: Every patient is unique. Be sure to take these general guidelines and discuss all available options, information, and questions with your physician

 

 

Tips for fatigue:

 

Talk to members of your healthcare team (e.g. doctors, nurse) about ways of managing any of the sideeffects that you might experience Ensure to have a well-balanced diet that is nutritious

Do regular light exercise (e.g. walking

Avoid being around people when they are sick

Take iron supplements or vitamin B12 (ask your healthcare team for advice)

Sharing how you feel with your partner or someone you trust

 

Tips for hot flushes:

 

Some medications can help with hot flushes

Some complementary therapies can help with hot flushes (e.g. acupuncture

Practice deep breathing and relaxation techniques

 

Tips for constipation:

 

Monitor bowel movements to identify constipation early

Talk with a dietitian about an eating plan that reduces constipation

Regular light exercise (e.g. walking

Talk with members of the healthcare team (e.g. doctor, nurse) about medications that can ease constipation

 

Tips for diarrhea

 

Talk with a dietitian about an eating plan that reduces diarrhea

Drink water to help replace fluid lost through diarrhea

Talk with members of the healthcare team (e.g. doctor, nurse) about medications that can ease diarrhea

 

 

 

 

Tips for weight gain:

 

Make some adjustments to diet through a health professionals’ (e.g. dietitian) advice and an eating plan

Exercise regularly (e.g. walking, jogging, stair climbing, weights, dancing, tennis

 

Tips for loss of muscle mass and strength:

 

Eat well and exercise

Talk to a dietitian for advice and an eating plan

Talk to the healthcare team about an exercise program that can maintain muscle mass and strength

Talk to the healthcare team about an exercise program that can maintain muscle mass and strength

 

Tips for appetite changes:

 

Eat small meals and snacks when hungry

Eat nutritious snacks such as dried fruits and nuts, yoghurt, cheese, eggs, milkshakes

Drink fluids between meals rather than with meals

If the smell of food makes you feel nauseous eat food that is cold or at room temperature

Talk to a health professional (e.g. dietitian) about a diet plan that can improve appetite or food that is easy to eat

 

Tips for Bowel and urinary problems:

 

Plan outings and social events carefully to accommodate continence management.

Practice pelvic floor muscle strengthening exercises to help with continence control.

Using pads could help with concerns when out in public.

Talk with the healthcare team (e.g. dietitian) about a diet that could improve bowel function.

Seek medical attention for all side effects relating to the bladder and bowel as they may require further medical attention.

 

Tips for thinning of bones:

 

Regular exercise (e.g. walking, jogging, stair climbing, weights, dancing, tennis)

Maintain a healthy weight

Take Vitamin D and calcium supplements

Seek a health professional’s advice (e.g. doctor) for medications

 

Tips for mood changes:

 

Ask healthcare team (e.g. doctor, nurse, psychologist) about management options

Talk about feelings with your partner, carer or someone you trust

Remember that these changes may be caused by the treatments

Regular exercise (e.g. walking, jogging, stair climbing, weights, dancing, tennis

 

Tips for mood changes incontince:

 

Talk to a physiotherapist for information on pelvic floor muscles training. Pelvic floor muscles are best learned and started before surgery and continued afterwards

Talk to physician who can offer suggestions about the best continence products, specific needs and waste product disposal

 

Tips for Incontinence:

 

Talk to a physiotherapist for information on pelvic floor muscles training. Pelvic floor muscles are best learned and started before surgery and continued afterwards.

Talk to physician who can offer suggestions about the best continence products, specific needs and waste product disposal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EAT HEALTHY

It is important to maintain your strength. What you eat can impact on your sense of health, vitality and wellbeing. A nutritionist or other members of the healthcare team can offer personalized nutritional advice on your diet.

In general, the following diet habits are recommended:

  • Eat plenty of vegetables, legumes/beans and fruit
  • Eat wholegrain (cereal) food such as bread, pasta, rice , noodles
  • Eat lean meat, fish and poultry as well as other protein sources such as tofu – include milk, yoghurt and cheese (reduced or low fat)
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Limit saturated fat such as biscuits, cakes, pies and processed meats
  • Limit added saltLimit added sugars such as confectionary, sugar-sweetened soft drinksLimit alcohol

Exercise

There may be times when you are feeling too fatigued to even think about exercising. You may have never really enjoyed any physical exercise. However, exercise has a wide range of health benefits. Exercise can also help with depression.

Regular gentle exercise can:

  • Help prevent you from getting sick
  • Help you sleep better
  • Make you feel more energized
  • Reduce muscle and mental tension.

Talk to a physiotherapist, exercise physiologist or another member of the healthcare team about a suitable exercise program for you.

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Sexuality, intimacy, cancer and caring

Some treatment for prostate cancer may affect your own sexuality and impact intimacy with your partner: this include loss of interest in sex, changes your ability to give and receive sexual or intimate pleasure, or changes to the way in which you see yourself or your partner.

 

Remember, this impact not  only the patients but their partners as well, and leave them feeling

- Rejected

- Alone

- They have attraction for the person they care for

- Guilty for wanting sex/intimacy

- Afraid that they will hurt person they care for

 

Talking about sexuality and intimacy openly can be awkward and challencing because they can be sensitive issues. Talking about fears and concers can be difficult if youre nout used talking about this matters.

Some people dont like to talk to anyone about what is going on or they "imagine" or "second guess" what is going with their partners.

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Pain

Not all men with advanced prostate cancer experience pain. Some may have no pain, whilst others will have varying degrees of pain. People react differently to pain so you can only ever describe how your own pain feels. Another person with the same stage of disease may not feel the pain in the same way that you do.

 

Let your healthcare team know straight away if you experience pain. Some men think that it is better to hold off as long as possible before they take any form of pain relief, but this tends to make the pain worse. Pain will affect your quality of life if it is not properly managed. Different health professionals will work together to make sure that your pain is managed properly, for example, by working out the best pain medication for your symptoms and a dosing schedule.